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Labor & Employment Laws Training

ADA

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) prohibits discrimination and harassment against qualified employees and applicants with disabilities, plus requires "reasonable accommodations" under certain circumstances. Reasonable accommodations are adjustments or modifications provided by an employer to enable people with disabilities to enjoy equal employment opportunities. Reasonable accommodation may include, but is not limited to making existing facilities used by employees readily accessible to, and usable by, persons with disabilities, or offering job restructuring, modifying work schedules, or reassignment to a vacant position. Get more information on HR ADA.
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Affirmative Action / EEO

Bringing diversity to your workplace is not just a legal obligation, but makes good business sense. With the advent of social media and wide internet usage, organizations can afford now less than even to develop a reputation of being discriminatory against minorities. At a bare minimum, your organization needs an equal opportunity policy statement. However, to make sure your organization will be perceived as socially responsible and be in accordance with the law, you need to do more: a comprehensive situational analysis and planning of how you can overcome a less than diverse workforce. A well-established reporting system for discriminatory behavior is also an absolute must. Get more information on HR Affirmative Action / EEO.
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Cafeteria Plans

This type of benefit plan is regulated in Section 125 of the Internal Revenue Code and oftentimes provides reduced-cost access to medications and health services. In addition to making your organization a more desirable place to work if you have a Cafeteria Plan, such plan also offers your organization tax advantages. Namely, you can reduce your bill for FUTA, FICA and workers’ compensation. However, you incur such tax benefit only if your plan is qualified. Learning these requirements is vital to the functioning of the HR department. In particular, the HR manager needs to make sure that the Cafeteria Plan does not discriminate against lower income employees. Get more information on HR Cafeteria Plans.

COBRA

COBRA generally applies to all group health plans maintained by private-sector employers with at least 20 employees. COBRA requires these employers to provide a temporary continuation of group health coverage that otherwise might be terminated - as long as certain conditions are met. Get more information on HR COBRA.

Disability / Leave Mgt.

Leave of Absence can take many forms. Some of these leaves are paid while others are unpaid. A solid and clearly spelled-out leave plan gives organizations the ability to guard against alleged discrimination while being able to give employees time off when necessary so that the overall performance of such leavers will be better in the long run. Furthermore, some leaves are mandated by legislation such as the Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act (USERRA). Almost one fourth of employees will suffer a disabling injury – oftentimes on the job. Because of this risk, employer-provided disability insurance makes good business sense. HR managers need to know who to prepare for absentees so that the workflow is not compromised. Get more information on HR Disability / Leave Mgt..
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FMLA

The federal Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) entitles eligible employees of covered employers to take unpaid, job-protected leave for specified family and medical reasons. Get more information on HR FMLA.
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Immigration / I-9 / E-Verify

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Labor & Employment Law

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